Dawes Proves Their Time Has Come in Baltimore

Dawes Proves Their Time Has Come in Baltimore

Last night, LA band Dawes brought their tour to Baltimore, MD. The Baltimore Soundstage, just a few blocks off of Baltimore’s inner harbor, provided a more intimate setting than most of the stops on this tour so far. The band has been touring on the heels of their most recent album We’re All Gonna Die, released last September, trying to pack in as much music as possible. As lead singer and guitar player Taylor Goldsmith claimed after just a few songs, “We left the opening bands at home. We have two long sets for you… We’ve just barely gotten started!”

From the first note, it was clear that the new tunes would play a large part in the night’s set. The band opened the show with “Quitter,” drawing the crowd into a long night of music. “Fire Away” allowed Goldsmith’s brother, drummer Griffin, to get some time on the vocals, singing lead in the song’s outro. The rest of the first set consisted of a good mix of Dawes classics, like “Right on Time” and “Don’t Send Me Away,” and songs from the new album.

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Dawes’ goal in the two set format for this tour is to be able to reach further into their back-catalog without sacrificing the more popular songs. In Baltimore, that meant bringing out one of Goldsmith’s self-proclaimed favorites, “Something in Common,” off of their 2013 album Stories Don’t End. The highlight for much of the crowd came at the end of the first set with “When My Time Comes,” eliciting a huge crowd sing-a-long to lead into set break.

Set two started off, as it has all year, with a short acoustic segment, easing back into the music after the break. This included a cover of Blake Mills’ (producer of We’re All Gonna Die and longtime friend to Goldsmith) “Hey Lover.” The new material is punctuated by great playing by the two newest members of Dawes, keyboard player Lee Pardini and touring guitar player Trevor Menear. Pardini, in particular, shone through mid-way into the second set on “Roll With The Punches,” his Hammond Organ taking over the lead instrumental role from the dual guitars of Goldsmith and Menear. The unsung hero of the show was bassist Wylie Gelber, who stuck to the side of the stage most of the night but proved over and over to be a rock solid foundation along with Griffin’s drumming.

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Two more new songs, “When the Tequila Runs Out” and the title track “We’re All Gonna Die,” sandwiched “From a Right Angle” to end the second set. The band returned to the stage to close out the show with two Dawes classics, “Time Spent in Los Angeles” and “All Your Favorite Bands.” Goldsmith handed the lead vocals off to the crowd for the final chorus of “Favorite Bands,” sending them off singing “I hope the world sees the same person that you always were to me, and may all your favorite bands stay together.”

Dawes will continue their “An Evening With Dawes” tour through the summer as well as playing a number of dates supporting John Mayer. You can find all of their upcoming tour dates as well as news and concert setlists on their website dawestheband.com

[tz_plusgallery id=”27″]
See full gallery of the night here.

Dawes’ Setlist

Set 1: 
QUITTER
FIRE AWAY
WINDOW SEAT
PICTURE OF A MAN
RIGHT ON TIME
SOMETHING IN COMMON
ONE OF US
DONT SEND ME AWAY
LESS THAN FIVE
LITTLE BIT
WMTC

Set 2:
CRACK THE CASE
ROLL TIDE
HEY LOVER
SOMEWHERE ALONG
PUNCHES
MOST PEOPLE
IF I WANTED
THINGS HAPPEN
TEQUILA
RIGHT ANGLE
WAGD
——
TIME SPENT
BANDS

Written by Ben Gartenstein

Instagram/twitter @opsopcopolis

bengartenstein.com

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